ASCAP Names 2001 Morton Gould Young Composer Award-Winners

On April 30, ASCAP Foundation President Marilyn Bergman announced the 26 winners of the 2001 ASCAP Foundation Morton Gould Young Composer Awards. Congratulating the award recipients, Marilyn Bergman said, “The Morton Gould Young Composer Awards provide recognition and encouragement for gifted young composers under the age of 30. We congratulate the recipients and extend thanks […]

American Academy in Rome Announces Winners of the 2001-2002 Rome Prize

The American Academy in Rome announced the winners of the 105th annual Rome Prize Competition on Thursday, April 19, 2001 in New York City. The prestigious Rome Prize provides fellowships for American artists and scholars to live and work at the Academy’s twelve-building, eleven-acre site atop the Janiculum hill in Rome, Italy. Two prizes were […]

Four Composers Receive First Music Commissions

New York Youth Symphony Four composers have recently received commissions from the New York Youth Symphony‘s First Music Program. Emily Lenore Doolittle, Anthony Cheung, and John Kaefer will each receive premieres of a new orchestral work in Carnegie Hall during the 2001-2002 Season. In addition, Michael Klingbeil has received the Chamber Music Commission; his new […]

NEA Chairman Bill Ivey Announces Resignation

Bill IveyPhoto by Max Hirshfeld On April 24, National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Bill Ivey announced his resignation, effective September 30, 2001, eight months before the end of his four-year term. Ivey has submitted a letter to President George W. Bush informing him of his decision. “My hope is that by announcing now that […]

Can American-born musicians learn to play your music? Paquito D’Rivera

Paquito D’RiveraPhoto by Mary Kent Cuban-born composer and saxophonistBased in New Jersey In the last few years, an increasing number of artists with the most diverse backgrounds have been attracted towards musical currents coming from South of the Rio Grande and mainly towards the music of Cuba, Argentina and Brazil, the three streams that form, […]

Robert Starer, Composer and Teacher, Dies at 77

Robert StarerPhoto courtesy of Sigma Alpha Iota Robert Starer, a respected composer of operas, ballets and many orchestral and instrumental works, and the author of two books on rhythm that are widely used by music students, died of heart failure on April 22 in Kingston, N.Y. He was 77. In a 1994 review of Starer’s […]

Can American-born musicians learn to play your music? Jin Hi Kim

Jin Hi KimPhoto by Camilla Van Zuylen Korean-born komongo virtuoso and composerBased in Connecticut Compared to the Western music tradition, Korean music is not precisely written for every nuance of notes. The music is not absolutely fixed. Its notation is also designed for this concept: notes are given, but more important is the creation of […]

Billy Higgins, Influential Jazz Drummer, Dies at 64

Billy HigginsPhoto by Dimitri Ianni Billy Higgins, one of the best-loved and most-recorded drummers in postwar jazz, died on May 3, 2001, at Daniel Freeman Hospital in Inglewood, Calif. He had been in failing health and was awaiting his second liver transplant. He was 64 and lived in Los Angeles. “Billy Higgins was the drummer […]

Can American-born musicians learn to play your music? 1

Ali Akbar KhanPhoto courtesy The Ali Akbar School of Music In the history of America, people never had a chance to learn or hear Indian music, so this has been a completely new thing for them. I was the first man to introduce Indian classical ragas to America in 1955. Slowly, slowly people have had […]