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Lowell Liebermann

Lowell LiebermannPhoto by Linda Harris The Dallas Symphony Orchestra‘s composer-in-residence, Lowell Liebermann, submitted a set of Three Impromptus, Op. 68. The Three Impromptus were written to commemorate the centennial of Yaddo. Stephen Hough gave the premiere at Alice Tully Hall on May 4, 2000. The title refers back to Schubert, according to Liebermann, because the […]

Billy Higgins, Influential Jazz Drummer, Dies at 64

Billy HigginsPhoto by Dimitri Ianni Billy Higgins, one of the best-loved and most-recorded drummers in postwar jazz, died on May 3, 2001, at Daniel Freeman Hospital in Inglewood, Calif. He had been in failing health and was awaiting his second liver transplant. He was 64 and lived in Los Angeles. “Billy Higgins was the drummer […]

James Mobberley

James MobberleyPhoto by Larry Levenson James Mobberley composed Give ‘em Hell! last year for the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum in Independence, Missouri. Pianist Robert Weirich gave the premiere performance on March 19, 2000 as part of series celebrating music at the White House. Truman was well known as an amateur pianist and an […]

Robert Starer, Composer and Teacher, Dies at 77

Robert StarerPhoto courtesy of Sigma Alpha Iota Robert Starer, a respected composer of operas, ballets and many orchestral and instrumental works, and the author of two books on rhythm that are widely used by music students, died of heart failure on April 22 in Kingston, N.Y. He was 77. In a 1994 review of Starer’s […]

Judith Lang Zaimont

Judith Lang ZaimontPhoto courtesy of the composer Tennessee native Judith Lang Zaimont submitted a work entitled Impronta Digitale, an eight and a half minute perpetuum mobile in shifting compound meters. The tempo of the piece is marked 192 to the dotted eighth: “extremely fast,” according to the composer. A running pulse is interrupted only twice […]

Joseph Horowitz

Joseph HorowitzPhoto courtesy of Joseph Horowitz Noted American writer Joseph Horowitz is using the Guggenheim grant to support his newest work, a complete history of American musical life during the Gilded Age. Mr. Horowitz will focus on concert music and opera written and performed between the Civil War and World War I. “I believe that […]

John Lewis Dies at 80

John LewisPhoto by Wil Mosgrove, courtesy of Atlantic Records John Lewis, a founding member of one of the most famous ensembles in jazz, the Modern Jazz Quartet, died in Manhattan on Thursday, March 29. He was 80. The M.J.Q. was a leading concert attraction from the mid-1950s to the late ’90s. The quartet made its […]

Ruth A. Inman

Ruth A. Inman is Librarian at Kennedy-King College in Chicago. She was granted the Epstein Award to study the records of the Martin and Morris Music Company, a pioneering gospel music publishing business in Chicago between 1940 and 1980. The proposed project will entail study of Company records, which are held at the Archives Center […]

Aaron Tanner, Emerging Composer, Dies in Milwaukee

Aaron Tanner and Jennifer Meier Photo courtesy of the family On February 25, 2001, the young Milwaukee composer Aaron Tanner was fatally shot, halting in mid-stride a career that was just starting to blossom. While walking from his apartment to the nearby home of a friend on the city’s northeast side, Aaron was robbed and […]

Elizabeth Bergman Crist

Elizabeth Bergman CristPhoto by Buckley Harris Crist Elizabeth Bergman Crist is Assistant Professor of Music at the University of Texas-Austin. Dr. Crist was granted the Epstein Award to support her research on Aaron Copland‘s music between 1932 and 1946 for a book tentatively titled Progressivism and Populism: Aaron Copland’s Music and Aesthetics during Depression and […]