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1st American Composers Invitational at Cliburn Competition

Van Cliburn Foundation Original works by four American composers – C. Curtis-Smith, Lowell Liebermann, James Mobberley, and Judith Lang Zaimont – have been chosen by the competitors for possible performance during the Eleventh Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. Each of the 12 contestants chosen for the semifinal round will be required to play one of […]

Lowell Liebermann

Lowell LiebermannPhoto by Linda Harris The Dallas Symphony Orchestra‘s composer-in-residence, Lowell Liebermann, submitted a set of Three Impromptus, Op. 68. The Three Impromptus were written to commemorate the centennial of Yaddo. Stephen Hough gave the premiere at Alice Tully Hall on May 4, 2000. The title refers back to Schubert, according to Liebermann, because the […]

Billy Higgins, Influential Jazz Drummer, Dies at 64

Billy HigginsPhoto by Dimitri Ianni Billy Higgins, one of the best-loved and most-recorded drummers in postwar jazz, died on May 3, 2001, at Daniel Freeman Hospital in Inglewood, Calif. He had been in failing health and was awaiting his second liver transplant. He was 64 and lived in Los Angeles. “Billy Higgins was the drummer […]

James Mobberley

James MobberleyPhoto by Larry Levenson James Mobberley composed Give ‘em Hell! last year for the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum in Independence, Missouri. Pianist Robert Weirich gave the premiere performance on March 19, 2000 as part of series celebrating music at the White House. Truman was well known as an amateur pianist and an […]

Robert Starer, Composer and Teacher, Dies at 77

Robert StarerPhoto courtesy of Sigma Alpha Iota Robert Starer, a respected composer of operas, ballets and many orchestral and instrumental works, and the author of two books on rhythm that are widely used by music students, died of heart failure on April 22 in Kingston, N.Y. He was 77. In a 1994 review of Starer’s […]

Judith Lang Zaimont

Judith Lang ZaimontPhoto courtesy of the composer Tennessee native Judith Lang Zaimont submitted a work entitled Impronta Digitale, an eight and a half minute perpetuum mobile in shifting compound meters. The tempo of the piece is marked 192 to the dotted eighth: “extremely fast,” according to the composer. A running pulse is interrupted only twice […]

NEA Chairman Bill Ivey Announces Resignation

Bill IveyPhoto by Max Hirshfeld On April 24, National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Bill Ivey announced his resignation, effective September 30, 2001, eight months before the end of his four-year term. Ivey has submitted a letter to President George W. Bush informing him of his decision. “My hope is that by announcing now that […]

1st Music 18 Commission Winners

Emily Doolittle Princeton doctoral student Emily Doolittle recently finished a set of three commissioned pieces for Tafelmusik. One piece, for the full ensemble, is called green notes; another, for just the string section, is called falling still; a third, for viola d’amore and soprano, is called Virelais. After the three pieces are performed at the […]

Four Composers Receive First Music Commissions

New York Youth Symphony Four composers have recently received commissions from the New York Youth Symphony‘s First Music Program. Emily Lenore Doolittle, Anthony Cheung, and John Kaefer will each receive premieres of a new orchestral work in Carnegie Hall during the 2001-2002 Season. In addition, Michael Klingbeil has received the Chamber Music Commission; his new […]

Athena

Christopher ArizaPhoto by A. Ariza In the fall of 1999, Christopher Ariza enrolled in a computer music course at NYU taught by Dr. Elizabeth Hoffman. The primary objective of the course was for the students to become familiar with two common computer music programs: Csound and Max. Ariza focused his time on developing algorithmic compositional […]