Field Reports

Ask Your Mama!: Five Questions for Laura Karpman

Ask Your Mama! will premiere at Carnegie Hall on March 16 as part of the Honor! Festival, a celebration of the African American cultural legacy curated by Jessye Norman. We saw the trailer and heard some rumors about a tone row, and just had to ask the work’s composer, Laura Karpman, a few questions.

In Memoriam

Steven L. Rosenhaus was an undergraduate music student at Queens College when he began private composition lessons with George Perle, and Christian Carey studied with Lukas Foss at Boston University during 1995-96; both offer memories of their mentors.

The Quest for the Crimson Grail

The reason that I volunteered for A Crimson Grail was simple: I wanted to participate in something that I had never experienced before, and could experience in no other way.

Required Listening: The New Albion Festival

If I were going to imagine the perfect summer music festival, it would be pretty much identical to the New Albion festival at SummerScape, which runs through August 10th in the Spiegeltent at Bard College.

Inescapable Creativity: Composing 365

Every day for the past year David Morneau has produced a new 60-second composition and distributed it via the Internet. His personal creative marathon is over on June 30, 2008, when he’ll post his last composition in this series.

The Final Review

NPAC is over, and the three chief missions with which we’ve been tasked—impress communities with our relevance, improve arts education, and increase diversity—are broad but by no means insurmountable goals.

The Impact of NPAC

I returned home from Denver with a renewed focus and excitement about what I’d like to accomplish this summer. That kind of clarity is a byproduct of the vibration that comes from being surrounded by several thousand art-makers and art-supporters, and I can’t think of the last time I was part of a specialized herd that large. It’s reassuring to know just how many of us there are out there.

Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

I’ve felt for a while that the greatest beneficiaries of the arts are not necessarily the audience members, but the participants. That’s one of the reasons why it’s so hard to make the case for supporting the arts to people who are not themselves artists.