Author Archives: Frank J. Oteri

About Frank J. Oteri

Frank J. Oteri, New Music USA's Composer Advocate and the Senior Editor of NewMusicBox, is an outspoken crusader for new music and the breaking down of barriers between genres. Frank’s own musical compositions reconcile structural concepts from minimalism and serialism and frequently explore microtonality.

In Life There is No Dolby

Sometimes extraneous noise, while hindering the ability to listen with undivided attention to the actual performance, is part of what makes concerts in alternative spaces exciting, socially-engaging events.

not a single night’s sky

New Millennium Ensemble Although the eight members of the Common Sense Composers’ Collective are spread all over the country, they mostly share a similar post-minimalist compositional aesthetic. And their shared sensibility has made the previous collective discs remarkably consistent for multiple-composer recordings. But on first listen, the omnivorous post-modernism of Ed Harsh (who also serves […]

Clap Hands

Steve Evans, vocals; Jake Vinsel, bass; Noritaka Tanaka, drums; Leandro Lopez Varady, piano According to the booklet notes on his new 2-CD set, jazz vocalist Steve Evans originally intended to release a live recording of his quartet, but “technical difficulties” intervened. So instead he imposed strict restrictions on his studio process in the hopes of […]

Wait, There’s More

I really can’t understand why some people feel compelled to walk out of a concert while a performance is still going on; is anything really so unbearable?

Shared Space

Do composers have the right, or even the ability, to determine the context in which their music gets heard?

A Conversation with Ben Johnston

Ben Johnston talks about the aesthetic dilemmas of contemporary music and his own pioneering work in extended intonation, as well as personal encounters with John Cage, Harry Partch, Milton Babbitt, and others—topics which all figure prominently in his newly published collection of writings, Maximum Clarity.

Food for Thought

If there is a larger relationship that music and food both share on an immediate, visceral level, finding out might tell us something about why certain people gravitate toward particular musical styles.