The Friday Informer: Waiting for the Rapture with an iPod in My Hand

Photo of the Week

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Composer Paola Prestini and Kronos cellist Jeffrey Zeigler wed at the home of the bride’s parents in Tucson, Arizona.

  • Composition for sk8ter boi via sweet Max/MSP patch—can be scored for stoked solo rider or ensemble.

  • Some call it global warming, others a plot of the left-wing scientific establishment. Either way, you might want to prepare yourself and your record collection for the great flood.

  • Speaking of Armageddon, no word yet on how the major staff change-ups at the Village Voice will affect new music vet Kyle Gann’s word count at the paper, but music editor Chuck Eddy was reportedly fired for running a section that was “too academic.” This, Carl Wilson helpfully points out, “somehow seems to be a way of saying he covered too much country and heavy metal too thoughtfully.” I went to j-school with Eddy’s incoming replacement, Rob Harvilla, so maybe I can exercise my new music evangelist skills on the guy.

  • Meanwhile, regarding a publication that proudly covers academic music (ahem)—Alex sums up the blogosphere commentary in response to the Steve Metcalf piece we published last week, and a few Sequenza21 readers weigh in, as well.

  • The future may or may not be all about the much-hyped little silver device. But if you want a piece of the poison, NPR’s Stacy Bond will be hosting a podcast crash course this weekend in San Francisco. [via BoingBoing]

  • Industry scapegoat or no, the trends do say something about what technology is doing to thoughtful human concertgoers. Apparently, however, even Bach would have been into it. [via The Overgrown Path]

One thought on “The Friday Informer: Waiting for the Rapture with an iPod in My Hand

  1. bdrogin

    Well, I’m totally confused by the new format, and how you apparently can’t create a new chatter comment but can only comment on some official chatter that’s already been posted. If I’m wrong, guidance is appreciated.

    Anyway, I guess I’m commenting on Molly commenting on Alex commenting on Steve, which means I have to attach it to Molly. I’m surprised that all three don’t comment on Greg, who has been devoting quite some time to the topic.

    A private comment to Greg applies to all of you – why do you confuse whether people are interested and listening to classical music (whether the works are by composers living or dead), with the question of why performing institutions can’t fill seats? Everyone writing about this stuff flip-flops back and forth between the two without noticing. Well, I notice.

    The fact is, listening through loudspeakers has become normative. The question of whether anyone is buying new classical music CDs, picking up used CDs and records on Amazon, eBay or at flea markets and used record stores, listening to classical music radio stations and broadcasts (if they exist), or classical music Internet streams or those nifty cable TV commercial-free music “channels,” is completely separate from the question of our dying, bloated, the-rich-wish-the-hoi polloi-would-stay-away non-profit cultural institutions.

    I’m not saying that listening to the natural live sound of an oboe isn’t different than listening to the recorded sound of an oboe, it’s just time for everyone to admit that everyone who knows any repertoire is doing most of their listening through loudspeakers, and the economics of loudspeaker listening is completely separate from the economics of non-loudspeaker listening – which, given the profusion of electronics and microphones and such, is rare even in many situations where people’s butts ARE in seats.

    No?

    Barry Drogin
    Not Nice Music

    P.S. Sorry about all of the new windows, but I like to keep my reader focused rather than trust their use of the back button. Until they get to the end, that is.

    Reply

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