The Friday Informer: Not Dead Yet

Video of the Week



If a YouTube clip of a Philip Glass appearance on SNL in 1986 is played in a room with 12 people, but only 6 of them are seated, how many miles are they from Detroit? [via ArtsJournal]

A pop-critic friend writes in this week to ask: Is “classical music is not dying” the new “classical music is dying”? In brief, Virginia, that might be the case, but it’s complicated. I rang up an expert, and he suggested that if we were really serious about it, we’d trade up on the whole “not dying” verbiage and go with something a little more, well, lively. Others suggested we take a more morbidly focused approach to the future of classical music. Regardless, we should probably keep an eye on those country music people, and it looks like a few death metal fans will be keeping an eye on us.

Meanwhile, we’ve received reports here at headquarters that the FBI is profiling electronic music composers. ASCAP seems to want legal confirmation of something, and it sounds complicated. All are not in favor. For their part, the RIAA is sticking to re-educating the college students.

There’s no doubt that present times are complicated times, and so there will be those who would rather take a backward glance. But if John can win the same award Milton did and The Bad Plus and Stanley Crouch can join the mutual admiration society, these times might also be called very promising (no matter what you think of Gerard).

One thought on “The Friday Informer: Not Dead Yet

  1. sarahcahill

    present and past
    Hi Molly- Thanks so much for including Michael Strickland’s blog entry about the Other Minds New Music Seance in your always much-anticipated Friday Informer. I’m not sure it’s quite right to call it a “backwards glance,” since there were seventeen living composers represented throughout the day, with six of them (Dan Becker, Carl Stone, Charles Amirkhanian, Phil Collins, Jonathan Russell, and Ronald Bruce Smith) in attendance. Michael’s blog also has a great description of the recent production of Lou Harrison’s opera Young Caesar, for those who are interested.

    Reply

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