10 Composers Win 2004 Guggenheim Fellowships



(Clockwise from top left) Alvin Curran (photo by Marion Gray), Marty Ehrlich (photo by Jimmy Katz), Jason Eckardt, Pamela Z (photo by Lori Eanes), Margaret Brouwer, Leroy Jenkins, Joan La Barbara, and Larry Polansky.

Ten composers and a musicologist have won 2004 Guggenheim Fellowships in the 80th annual United States and Canadian competition, announced Foundation President Edward Hirsch today. Fellowship winners include 185 artists, scholars, and scientists selected from over 3,200 applicants for awards totaling $6,912,000. They range in age from 32 to 92, represent 87 academic institutions (though not all are affiliated with a college or university), and work in a wide range of fields, from the natural sciences to the creative arts.

The winning composers are:

  • Margaret Brouwer, Composer, Cleveland Heights, Ohio; Vincent K. and Edith H. Smith Chair in Composition and Department Head, Cleveland Institute of Music.

  • Alvin Curran, Composer, Rome, Italy; Milhaud Professor of Music Composition, Mills College.

  • Jason Eckardt, Composer, New York City; Lecturer in Music Composition, Northwestern University.

  • Marty Ehrlich, Composer and Performer, New York City.

  • Leroy Jenkins, Composer and Performer, Brooklyn, New York.

  • Joan La Barbara, Composer and Performer, New York City.

  • Larry Polansky, Composer, Hanover, New Hampshire; Associate Professor of Music, Dartmouth College.

  • Frances White, Composer, Princeton, New Jersey.

  • Carolyn Yarnell, Composer, Laguna Hills, California.

  • Pamela Z, Composer and Performer, San Francisco.

In addition, musicologist Leo Treitler, distinguished professor emeritus of music, Graduate Center, City University of New York, was also awarded a fellowship.

Decisions are based on recommendations from hundreds of expert advisors and are approved by the Foundation’s Board of Trustees, which includes seven members who are themselves past Fellows of the Foundation–Joel Conarroe, Joyce Carol Oates, Richard A. Rifkind, Charles A. Ryskamp, Wendy Wasserstein, Ellen Taaffe Zwilich, and Edward Hirsch.

Guggenheim Fellows are appointed “on the basis of distinguished achievement in the past and exceptional promise for future accomplishment.”

Since 1925, the Foundation has granted more than $230 million in Fellowships to over 15,500 individuals.